Posted: 29 September, 2011 by The Learned One

Triple M Footy Nominates The Five Greatest Norm Smith Medallists Of All Time

Find out who we rated No.1. Do you agree with our list? Leave your comments!

Tags: afl, grand final, Countdown, Triple M, Norm, Smith, Medal

(Vision: Channel Seven)

5. Michael Long (Essendon) Vs Carlton – 1993

In what was the international year of the indigenous people, it was very fitting that Long was adjudged best afield in the 1993 Grand Final. The Aboriginal superstar set the MCG alight as he tormented the Blues with his full bag of tricks. And there was no more impressive trick than the goal he kicked in the above video which has gone down as one of the greatest in grand final history. Long owned the wings and his opponents, most notably Mark Athorn, had no way of curbing his devastating influence. The 23-year-old helped himself to 33 possessions eight marks and two goals as the Bombers beat the Blues by 44 points and clinched their 15th flag.

(Vision: Channel Seven)

4. Peter Matera (West Coast) Vs Geelong – 1992

Twelve months after losing the 1991 Grand Final, the Eagles would need a star performance to ensure the same thing wouldn’t happen in 1992. Enter Peter Matera. The brilliant midfielder announced himself on the big stage in blistering fashion. Playing on the wing, he collected 18 touches and five goals – four of which were nothing short of gob-smacking. The best of the five can be viewed in the above video. The Eagles would go on to beat the Cats by 28 points and win their first premiership just five years after entering the competition.

(Vision: Channel Seven)

3. Greg Williams (Carlton) Vs Geelong – 1995

The man they call ‘Diesel’ saved one of his very best performances for the biggest match of his career. Williams hadn’t yet tasted premiership success after 12 seasons in the game and he wasn’t going to let this opportunity pass by. Carlton had only lost two matches in 1995 and Williams played a big role in making sure the Blues’ winning ways well and truly continued on Grand Final day. Williams racked up a season-high 31 disposals and booted five goals to stand out like a beacon as the Blues pumped Geelong by 61 points and secured their 16th premiership. The cheekiest of Williams’ five goals can be seen in the above video.

(Vision: Channel Seven)

2. Kevin Bartlett (Richmond) Vs Collingwood – 1980

Bartlett earned the nickname ‘Hungry’ for a reason. Over a whopping 403 career games, KB amassed a total of 778 goals and in the 1980 Grand Final he produced his second-best bag of seven. In a spellbinding exhibition of attacking play, Bartlett – at the ripe old age of 33 – was unstoppable and ended up with 11 scoring shots. Bartlett also took nine marks and got the ball 21 times with just one of those possessions going down as a handball! Richmond savaged the Magpies by 81 points on the day (a grand final record although it only lasted three years) and claimed its 10th premiership.

(Vision: Channel Seven)

1. Gary Ablett senior (Geelong) Vs Hawthorn – 1989

It’s no secret that Ablett was one of the game’s greatest ever players and he achieved one of his most impressive feats – even by his standards – in the 1989 Grand Final when he equalled goalkicking legend Gordon Coventry’s record of nine majors in the big dance. Ablett was simply amazing as he not only kicked some ripper goals but also took some beautiful marks. The pick of his goals on the day can be viewed in the above video. Unfortunately for Ablett and his Cats, they would lose to the Hawks by a goal in one of the greatest grand finals ever played. It would also serve as the first of four losing premiership deciders Ablett would feature in for Geelong over a period of just seven seasons. Ablett was the first of only four players to ever win a Norm Smith Medal in a losing grand final team.

Do you agree with our top five? If not, what changes would you make?

Tags: afl, grand final, Countdown, Triple M, Norm, Smith, Medal

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