Scam Alert: Australians Are Falling Trap To Scammers Whilst Trying To Gain Early Access To Their Superannuation Funds During Coronavirus

Australians are getting caught out


Article heading image for Scam Alert: Australians Are Falling Trap To Scammers Whilst Trying To Gain Early Access To Their Superannuation Funds During Coronavirus

https://www.pexels.com/

The government is offering a scheme to aid Australians who have been financially affected by COVID-19 and allow them early access to their superannuation funds.

This scheme introduced by the government has been a lifeline for residents struggling through these difficult times but it has also been a chance for internet scammers to steal from innocent and unknowing Australians.

The initiative allows eligible citizens to apply for up to $10,000 in 2019-20 and to again apply for a further $10,000 in 2020-21.

So far 150 Australians have been scammed into losing thousands of dollars whilst trying to gain early access to their super funds.

The Deputy Chair of the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC), Delia Rikard spoke to Brian and explained how these scammers are gaining access to people’s personal details and superannuation funds.

Rikard states that the scammers do lots of fishing to get details but there are two main ways that they acquire them.

“Calling you offering to help you and getting you to give them more details then they go away and access it themselves…probably the most common is these vouchers being texted and emailed to people saying we will give you a $250 food voucher from either Woolworths or Coles to help you through these difficult times, we just want you to fill in a few questions and of course it is all of your bank account details and your superannuation account details.”

She explained that they then use these details to either create a fake MyGov profile impersonating the person or they gain access to your already existing account and alter your details.

Rickard encourages everyone to go on and check their MyGov accounts to make sure that their details are correct in case a scammer has gained access to their accounts.

She also urges anyone who thinks they may have fallen victim to a scammer, either over the phone or on the computer, to call their superannuation company and the ATO and to let them know that it may be vulnerable.

“Whatever you do, never ever ever give anyone your superannuation details no matter who they say they are or how they contact you.”

Catch up on the full interview below: 

Chelsea Wilde

4 June 2020

Article by:

Chelsea Wilde




Listen Live!

Latest Catch up